Romancing the old stone
Cart 0

Cuisine

The making of the kitchen

What is 4-1/2 years in the life of a 400 year-old convent?  After the slow and organic process of renovation with countless hours of research, months of back-breaking work removing centuries-old additions, and with sometimes just being still - the transformation of this kitchen is beyond remarkable. The 4-1/2 year renovation project turned into a resurrection project, bringing back to life the soul, heart and spirit of this ancient, sacred place.   Pure and noble materials, traditional methods and haute gamme (highest quality) modern technologies created the sublime mélange of its form and function. Here it is at the beginning...     ...

Read more →


Our ancestors could teach us a thing or two about roasting meats!

Our ancestors could teach us a thing or two about roasting meats!

This is called a tournebroche and was used for centuries to roast meats. The craftsmanship of that time is still unparalleled as it is not only completely efficient, but a piece of art in our kitchen!  It is so mesmerizing to watch...                                                                                                                       ...

Read more →


Here's the scoop again...It's all in the grind.

Here's the scoop again...It's all in the grind.

The little scoop that was rescued from the brocante and lovingly restored now has a prominent place and job in our kitchen!  It has become a coffee bean scoop. The best coffee is made with the best beans and then ground fresh daily, slowly and manually. Using a manual coffee grinder ensures that the coffee retains its maximum flavor.  Electric grinders grind too fast and heats up the grind therefore losing some of its flavor. We have a coffee grinding station in our kitchen with two enormous Peugeot Freres antique coffee grinders. These grinders were originally used in the 19th and early 20th centuries...

Read more →


Crazy for Copper!!

Crazy for Copper!!

Shiny copper cookware is sublime.  Being surrounded by their beauty makes me heady, and most importantly, inspires me to cook.  I instantly fell in love with antique copper pots and pans the first moment I walked into the kitchen at the chateau of Chenonceau (pictured above). Since then, I have started my own collection, some bearing the richness and "beauty marks" of their faithful years of service.  When I cook with them I fantasize about the kitchens they occupied, the meals they helped to prepare, the cooks that used them and the stories and intrigues of the families they cooked for.  I handle them almost as...

Read more →